March 6 was the Emergency Declaration from the Governor.  March 19 was the stay at home order.  In the meantime, since March 15, a record 1.5 million Pennsylvanians have applied for unemployment.  That’s an average of 300,000 per week in contrast to roughly 10,000 a week before the crisis hit.  With the statewide shut down,

If you are watching the news today, (3/24/20) you have some impression of what New Orleans must have been like in the hours before Hurricane Katrina hit.  The Coronavirus storm is hitting New York City and the lower counties with a fury.  The numbers are rising fast throughout our region as well, although New York

In the perhaps “too many years” I have been reading and reporting on family law cases, there are times when a reported case inspires a collective shrug from the family law bar.  One prominent example is Beasley v. Beasley, a case that held that because a law firm was owned by a single lawyer,

Readers of this blog understand that, in the end, divorce is a financial transaction.  It is a process imbued with enormous emotional consequence.  People marry and have children hoping and often expecting the best.  We know it does not always turn out that way, and along the way, people turn to lawyers to develop a

In the divorce business, there are few alleys as dark as of the college financial aid.  We are commonly asked how separation and divorce may affect eligibility for student aid and loans.  The October 21, 2019 Wall Street Journal sheds some light on this murky subject and is worth a full read.  But, the main

Whenever I start these kinds of articles, I stop to ask, “Is this subject really relevant to the process of divorce?”   Separation and divorce are realities of modern day life.  Education of the children who come into this world through marriage is not just a major expense.  For any caring parent, it is also a

Just before Christmas last year, Congress passed and the President signed a major tax reform package that contained a surprising wrinkle.  It abandoned a decades long provision that permitted payors of alimony or spousal support to deduct their payments from income and required recipients to report the payments and pay tax on them.

The effective

On June 19, 2018, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, in an Opinion that could be described as unanimous, ruled that the trial court was correct when it decided that it could deviate from presumptive minimum guidelines in a high-end child support case. The case has been floating about for quite some time. We wrote about the

We have still not seen a copy of the Senate bill although PBS Newshour reports that the final version adopted by the Senate was not circulated in the Senate until late Friday evening and about 5 hours before the vote.  However, it appears that the Senate bill does not change existing alimony rules.  As noted